Reports on Transportation

The reports below represent a sample of Frontier Group’s work on Transportation. For more of our reports on this and related topics, please visit www.PolicyArchive.org. Full archive coming soon.

Electric Buses: Clean Transportation for Healthier Neighborhoods and Cleaner Air

All-electric buses are here, and they’re cleaner, healthier and often cheaper for transit agencies, school districts and bus contractors to run in the long-term. To clear our air and protect our health, policymakers should accelerate the replacement of diesel and other fossil fuel-powered buses with clean, electric buses.

(May 2018)
Plugging In: Readying America’s Cities for the Arrival of Electric Vehicles

With more EVs on the road, and many more coming soon, cities will face the challenge of where electric vehicles will charge, particularly in city centers and neighborhoods without off-street residential parking. The good news is that smart public policies, including those already pioneered in cities nationally and internationally, can help U.S. cities lead the electric vehicle revolution while expanding access to clean transportation options for those who live, work and play in cities.

(February 2018)
Road to a Fossil Free Washington: How Electric Vehicles and Renewable Energy Can Repower Washington State

Today, Washington’s transportation system is powered almost entirely by fossil fuels, a dependence that pollutes the air and water, and contributes to global warming. Road to a Fossil Free Future finds that Washington has the wind and solar resources to meet all of its energy needs - while also powering an electrified, emission-free transportation system in which Washington's existing vehicle fleet is fully replaced with electric cars, trucks and buses. 

(February 2018)
Who Pays for Parking?: How Federal Tax Subsidies Jam More Cars into Congested Cities, and How Cities Can Reclaim Their Streets

The United States currently spends $7.3 billion per year to encourage people to drive to work through the federal income tax exclusion for  commuter parking. The “commuter parking benefit” puts more cars on the road in our most congested cities at the most congested times of day––exactly the opposite of what most cities want or need. Who Pays for Parking? documents the cost of the commuter parking for cities and highlights tools cities can use to reclaim their streets.

(September 2017)
Complete Streets for St. Pete: Building a Healthier, Safer City through Better Street Design

Complete Streets – streets designed for all road users, including people on foot, on bike or taking transit – can help address transportation and public health problems in St. Petersburg.

(May 2017)
Highway Boondoggles 3: Big Projects. Bigger Price Tags. Limited Benefits.

America spends tens of billions of dollars each year on wasteful highway projects that are unnecessary or damaging to our communities - even as crying needs for road maintenance and better transportation options go unmet. Highway Boondoggles 3 examines nine dubious highway projects from around the country, costing more than $10 billion, that will do little to address real transportation needs.

(April 2017)
50 Steps Toward Carbon-Free Transportation: Rethinking U.S. Transportation Policy to Fight Global Warming

America’s transportation system has emerged as Climate Enemy #1, with cars, trucks and other vehicles now representing the nation’s largest source of carbon pollution, and America producing more transportation carbon pollution per capita than any other major industrialized nation. There is hope, however. New technologies and emerging social trends, from the resurgence of interest in walkable neighborhoods to advances in electric vehicles – create new opportunities to move the nation toward a zero-carbon transportation system, and to do it in ways that improve our health and well-being and support a vibrant economy.

(October 2016)
Fast Forward: The Technology Revolution in Transportation and What it Means for Massachusetts

FAST FORWARD: The Technology Revolution in Transportation and What it Means for Massachusetts reviews the current state of innovative mobility in the Commonwealth, explores the implications of innovative technologies and services for our communities and our transportation system, and proposes a public policy framework for the integration of these services into our cities and towns.

(October 2016)
Drive Clean and Save: Electric Vehicles Are a Good Deal for California Consumers and the Environment

Electric vehicles (EVs) are clean, fun to drive, never require a stop at the gas station, and are a key part of California’s strategy for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from transportation, the state’s biggest source of climate-altering pollution. Today’s mass-market battery electric vehicles are also a good deal and will likely save money for consumers compared to similar gasoline-powered vehicles. 

(July 2016)
A New Way Forward: Envisioning a Transportation System without Carbon Pollution

New technologies, new tools and emerging social trends make it easier than ever before to envision how America might transform its transportation system to one with little to no impact on the climate. With America facing an urgent imperative to eliminate carbon pollution to meet the terms of the Paris climate agreement, now is the time for action. Our report, A New Way Forward: Envisioning a Transportation System without Carbon Pollution, makes the case that America has the tools and strategies it needs to eliminate carbon pollution from urban, light-duty transportation by 2050.

(May 2016)
Highway Boondoggles 2: More Wasted Money and America’s Transportation Future

America faces a long-term transportation funding crisis. Our roads, bridges and transit systems are falling into disrepair. Demand is growing for public transit and safe bicycle and pedestrian routes. Traditional sources of transportation revenue, especially the gas tax, are not keeping pace with the needs. Even with the recent passage of a five-year federal transportation bill, the future of transportation funding remains uncertain. Highway Boondoggles 2: More Wasted Money and America’s Transportation Future studies 12 proposed highway projects across the country – slated to cost at least $24 billion – that exemplify the need for a fresh approach to transportation spending.

(January 2016)
Who Pays for Roads?: How the "Users Pay" Myth Gets in the Way of Solving America's Transportation Problems

Many Americans believe that drivers pay the full cost of the roads they use through gas taxes and other user fees. That has never been the case, and it is less true today than ever. Increasingly, American taxpayers are bearing more of the burden of paying for building, maintaining and operating our roads, regardless of how much they drive. Who Pays for Roads? exposes how long-running myths about how America pays for transportation continue to distort transportation policy, and argues for thorough reform of how the United States raises and spends transportation funds.

(May 2015)
The Innovative Transportation Index: The Cities Where New Technologies and Tools Can Reduce Your Need to Own a Car

Find out how your city ranked! And click here for shareable graphics you can use to tell all your friends about how great your favorite city is.

 
 

 

 

Rapid technological advances have enabled the creation of new transportation tools that make it possible for more Americans to live full and engaged lives without owning a car. Many of these new tools have been in existence for less than a decade – some for less than five years – but they have spread rapidly to cities across the United States.

 

This report reviews the availability of 11 technology-enabled transportation services – including online ridesourcing, carsharing, ridesharing, taxi hailing, static and real-time transit information, multi-modal apps, and virtual transit ticketing – in 70 U.S. cities. It finds that residents of 19 cities, with a combined population of nearly 28 million people, have access to eight or more of these services, with other cities catching up rapidly.

(February 2015)
Subsidizing Congestion: The Multibillion-Dollar Tax Subsidy that's Making Your Commute Worse

Federal tax subsidies for commuter parking add 820,000 cars to the roads - often during rush hour in America's biggest, most congested cities - at a cost to taxpayers of $7.3 billion per year, according to Subsidizing Congestion, a report issued by the civic philanthropy TransitCenter and Frontier Group. The report finds that the tax benefit for commuter transit use - while beneficial - only weakly counteracts the negative effects of the parking subsidy. The report calls for detailed evaluation of commuter tax benefits and reforms to better align tax incentives with the nation's overall transportation goals.

(November 2014)
Millennials in Motion : Changing Travel Habits Among Young Americans and their Implications for Public Policy

Members of the Millennial generation are driving less than previous generations of young Americans and taking transit and biking more. They are more likely to want to live in urban and walkable communities, more technologically connected, and more likely to use new transportation apps and services than older Americans. What is behind those changes? And will they last? Millennials in Motion explores the many factors at play in Millennials' move away from driving and argues that many of those changes are likely to be lasting.

(October 2014)

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