Frontier Group

Nav

Report

The Threat of “Forever Chemicals”
a woman's hand holding a clear glass beneath a running kitchen tap

Toxic threats

The Threat of “Forever Chemicals”

PFAS, or "forever chemicals," are used in non-stick pans, paper products, textiles, firefighting foam, electronics and other products. However, PFAS are dangerous for public health. Nearly indestructible in the environment, PFAS can cause kidney cancer, thyroid disruption, reduced responses to vaccination and other health problems. The Threat of "Forever Chemicals" documents the presence of these chemicals in Maryland and the risk they pose, and recommends steps for Maryland to protect public health and the environment.

Report  

Renewables on the Rise 2021
Wind turbines in eastern Washington state

Clean energy

Renewables on the Rise 2021

In 2020, America produced almost four times as much renewable electricity from the sun and the wind as in 2011, with wind and solar producing 11% of our nation’s electricity in 2020, up from 3% in 2011. Virtually every day, there are new developments that increase our ability to produce renewable energy, apply it to a wider range of energy needs, and reduce our overall energy use.

Renewables on the Rise 2021 reviews the progress of states and the nation toward a clean energy system powered by renewable energy and tracks the progress of the key technologies that will make that system a reality. 

Report  

Trouble in the Air
woman wearing mask against air pollution

Clean air

Trouble in the Air

Millions of Americans are exposed to unhealthy levels of pollution every year. Ozone and small particulate matter, among other pollutants, are widespread in the U.S. and have serious health effects. This report examines EPA air quality data from 2020 and shows how often Americans living in large urban areas, small urban areas and rural counties were exposed to air pollution that could damage their health.

Report  

Trash in America
recycling bin overflowing with plastic

Recycling & compost

Trash in America

Our current system of consumption and disposal wastes natural resources and creates pollution that threatens our health, environment and the global climate. Trash in America explores how the costs of this system fall on society at large – not on the producers and consumers who drive it – and argues that America should move toward an economic system characterized by zero waste and a “closed-loop” economy in which less is consumed and all materials are reused, recycled and composted in a continuous cycle.

Report  

Unhealthy Debt

Health care

Unhealthy Debt

The high cost of health care, expensive monthly insurance premiums, high deductibles, and expenses not covered by insurance all add to health care’s strain on Oregonians’ finances. One indication of the financial burden of health care is the number of Oregonians filing for bankruptcy who report having medical debt. To help consumers, Oregon policymakers should pursue a variety of policies to reduce the high cost of health care, including a state-level public insurance option.

Report  

Rooftop Solar at Risk

Solar power

Rooftop Solar at Risk

California’s ambitious climate and clean energy goals depend on steady growth in rooftop solar power. Utilities, however, are pushing for dramatic reductions in compensation to solar customers that could disrupt that growth – cuts similar to those that have triggered dramatic declines in solar installations in other states. To avoid a “solar cliff,” California must learn from those cautionary examples and adopt policies that provide a solid foundation for future growth in rooftop solar.

Report  

The Environmental Case for Rooftop Solar Energy

Solar power

The Environmental Case for Rooftop Solar Energy

Solar panels installed on our homes and businesses are a great source of clean, renewable energy, but they have many other benefits as well. From reducing the land needed for power generation and electricity transmission to helping conserve water, and from improving local resilience against outages to accelerating the decarbonization of our energy sector, rooftop solar is a crucial tool for mitigating and adapting to global warming.

Report  

Safe for Swimming?

Clean water

Safe for Swimming?

The Clean Water Act, adopted in 1972, set the goal of making all of our waterways safe for swimming. Nearly a half-century later, Americans visiting their favorite beach are still met all too often by advisories warning that the water is unsafe for swimming. Safe for Swimming? assesses water qulity at our nation's coastal and Great Lakes beaches, and highlights strategies for keeping our swimming areas free of dangerous pollution, now and for the future.

Report  

Blocking Rooftop Solar

Solar power

Blocking Rooftop Solar

Fossil fuel and utility interests are working across multiple states to slow the adoption of rooftop solar. Blocking Rooftop Solar explores the tactics these solar opponents have used — including their efforts to remove incentives or impose new charges — and how policymakers can respond to keep renewable energy growing.

Report  

We Have the Power
wind turbines

Clean energy

We Have the Power

Fossil fuels are responsible for a rapidly warming planet, for hundreds of thousands of deaths in the U.S. each year from air pollution, and for untold environmental damage. We Have the Power explores America's potential for a large-scale shift to emission-free energy from the wind, sun and other renewable sources, and how such a shift can solve many of America’s most pressing environmental and public health challenges.

Report  

Show More