Reports on Energy

The reports below represent a sample of Frontier Group’s work on Energy. For more of our reports on this and related topics, please visit www.PolicyArchive.org. Full archive coming soon.

Rhode Island Responds to Global Warming: Priority Policies for Reducing Rhode Island's Contribution to Global Warming

In 2001, the governors of the six New England states made an historic commitment to reduce their region’s emissions of global warming pollution. Rhode Island Responds to Global Warming documents how Rhode Island could make major strides toward reducing emissions of global warming gases over the next several decades by adopting a series of policy strategies to improve energy efficiency and reduce the use of fossil fuels.

(August 2004)
Toward a Consumer-Oriented Electric System: Assuring Affordability, Reliability, Accountability, and Balance After a Decade of Restructuring

The restructuring of the electric industry during the 1990s was touted as a way to reduce costs for consumers and promote innovation and competition. But, a decade later, consumers in many states that have undergone restructuring are faced with high prices, unreliable service, few choices and less accountability from electric utilities. Toward a Consumer-Oriented Electric System documents the many challenges facing the electric system after a decade of restructuring and proposes a series of principles and policies for resolving these problems for the benefit of consumers.

(June 2004)
Greening the Budget: 11 Ideas for Protecting the Environment and Easing Maryland's Fiscal Crisis

Eleven fiscally sound and environmentally friendly “green budget” policies evaluated in this report could help the State of Maryland ease its budget crisis while discouraging waste and pollution. Closing harmful loopholes in the tax code, eliminating unfair subsidies for pollution, and cutting wasteful projects would create financial disincentives for sprawling growth, air pollution, wetlands development, overuse of groundwater, and other environmentally damaging activities. Adopting these policies could increase state revenues by at least $145 million, with up to $3 billion in long-term savings.

(June 2004)
Connecticut Responds to Global Warming: An Analysis of Connecticut's Emission Reduction Goals, Current Strategies, and Opportunities for Progress

In 2001, the governors of the six New England states made an historic commitment to reduce their region’s emissions of global warming pollution. Connecticut Responds to Global Warming documents how Connecticut could make major strides toward reducing emissions of global warming gases over the next several decades by adopting a series of policy strategies to improve energy efficiency and reduce the use of fossil fuels.

(March 2004)
Predictably Unpredictable: Volatility in Future Energy Supply and Price from Over-Dependence on Natural Gas

In response to the 2000-2001 energy crisis on the West Coast, Washington state policy makers rushed to approve and encourage the construction of as many natural gas power plants as possible. Demand for natural gas across the country is skyrocketing, and domestic supplies are tight. Predictably Unpredictable explains how Washington is setting itself up for an energy crisis by relying so heavily on one fuel source, and recommends tapping the vast in-state potential for renewable energy instead.

(September 2003)
After the Blackout: Achieving a Cleaner, More Reliable Electric System

The Northeast blackout of 2003 showed yet again that today's cumbersome, centralized power grid linked to fossil fuel-fired and nuclear power plants is a costly, unreliable and environmentally destructive anachronism. After the Blackout, a paper issued three weeks after the blackout cut power to 50 million people in the U.S. and Canada, distills the lessons of the blackout and calls for the creation of a decentralized, resilient and consumer-focused electric system that taps the nation’s ample potential for energy efficiency, clean renewable power, and distributed generation.

(September 2003)

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