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Financial Privacy In The States: How Consumers Benefit From Personal Information Safeguards

Federal regulation riddled with loopholes has left large bank conglomerates and other financial institutions with too much leeway to share consumers’ private information and too little responsibility for the consequences. Financial Privacy in the States documents the growing concerns that Americans have about financial privacy, presents a survey of state laws that have helped fill regulatory gaps in the financial privacy sphere, and provides an estimate of the economic burden consumers currently bear as a result of inadequate privacy safeguards.

(February 2004)
Phosphorus Pollution in Florida's Waters: The Need for Aggressive Action to Protect Florida's Rivers and Streams from Nutrient Runoff

The excess flow of nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus, into Florida’s waterways has led to serious water quality problems—ranging from dramatic changes in the distribution of plant species in parts of the Everglades to algae blooms and fish kills in waterways such as Lake Apopka and Lake Okeechobee. But while Florida has made progress against nutrient pollution in some specific cases, the state’s overall response has been insufficient to ensure the cleanup of already polluted waterways and the prevention of future nutrient pollution problems. 

(December 2004)
Predictably Unpredictable: Volatility in Future Energy Supply and Price from Over-Dependence on Natural Gas

In response to the 2000-2001 energy crisis on the West Coast, Washington state policy makers rushed to approve and encourage the construction of as many natural gas power plants as possible. Demand for natural gas across the country is skyrocketing, and domestic supplies are tight. Predictably Unpredictable explains how Washington is setting itself up for an energy crisis by relying so heavily on one fuel source, and recommends tapping the vast in-state potential for renewable energy instead.

(September 2003)
After the Blackout: Achieving a Cleaner, More Reliable Electric System

The Northeast blackout of 2003 showed yet again that today's cumbersome, centralized power grid linked to fossil fuel-fired and nuclear power plants is a costly, unreliable and environmentally destructive anachronism. After the Blackout, a paper issued three weeks after the blackout cut power to 50 million people in the U.S. and Canada, distills the lessons of the blackout and calls for the creation of a decentralized, resilient and consumer-focused electric system that taps the nation’s ample potential for energy efficiency, clean renewable power, and distributed generation.

(September 2003)
Cars and Global Warming: Policy Options to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Massachusetts Cars and Light Trucks

The transportation sector produces roughly 35 percent of Massachusetts’ global warming pollution. Cars and Global Warming explains how Massachusetts could reduce global warming emissions from passenger vehicles by adopting California’s clean car standards. By requiring advanced-technology vehicles—including hybrid-electric and eventually hydrogen vehicles—and establishing global warming pollution standards, the clean cars program will begin to reduce Massachusetts’ contribution to global warming.

(April 2003)

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