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Growing Up Toxic: Chemical Exposures and Increases in Developmental Disease

Problems like premature birth; male genital defects; learning, attention, and emotional disturbances; early puberty; obesity; and low sperm quality have been increasing in California and the nation as a whole over the past several decades. While a range of factors, from lifestyle to heredity, may contribute to these trends, a growing body of research suggests that toxic chemicals play a significant role. Growing Up Toxic reviews scientific evidence (as of 2004) linking chemical exposures to developmental disease, documents that reducing exposure can prevent harm and recommends a series of policy reforms to protect children from toxic exposures.

(June 2004)
Greening the Budget: 11 Ideas for Protecting the Environment and Easing Maryland's Fiscal Crisis

Eleven fiscally sound and environmentally friendly “green budget” policies evaluated in this report could help the State of Maryland ease its budget crisis while discouraging waste and pollution. Closing harmful loopholes in the tax code, eliminating unfair subsidies for pollution, and cutting wasteful projects would create financial disincentives for sprawling growth, air pollution, wetlands development, overuse of groundwater, and other environmentally damaging activities. Adopting these policies could increase state revenues by at least $145 million, with up to $3 billion in long-term savings.

(June 2004)
More Highways, More Pollution: Road-Building and Air Pollution in America's Cities

While stronger regulations have resulted in cars that are far cleaner than those of three decades ago, the air in many American cities remains dangerous to breathe. The reason: Americans are driving more miles than ever before and that additional driving is spurred in part by the expansion of America's highway network, which is one of the major causes of suburban sprawl. More Highways, More Pollution finds that American cities with the largest highway networks per capita also tend to be those with the greatest air pollution and warns that further highway expansion could lead to additional air pollution and threats to public health.

(March 2004)
A Blueprint for Action: Policy Options to Reduce Massachusetts' Contribution to Global Warming

In 2001, the governors of the six New England states made an historic commitment to reduce their region’s emissions of global warming pollution. A Blueprint for Action documents how Massachusetts could make major strides toward reducing emissions of global warming gases over the next several decades by adopting a series of policy strategies to improve energy efficiency and reduce the use of fossil fuels.

(March 2004)
Connecticut Responds to Global Warming: An Analysis of Connecticut's Emission Reduction Goals, Current Strategies, and Opportunities for Progress

In 2001, the governors of the six New England states made an historic commitment to reduce their region’s emissions of global warming pollution. Connecticut Responds to Global Warming documents how Connecticut could make major strides toward reducing emissions of global warming gases over the next several decades by adopting a series of policy strategies to improve energy efficiency and reduce the use of fossil fuels.

(March 2004)

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