Reports on Transportation

The reports below represent a sample of Frontier Group’s work on Transportation. For more of our reports on this and related topics, please visit www.PolicyArchive.org. Full archive coming soon.

Making Sense of Hydrogen: The Potential Role of Hydrogen in Achieving a Clean, Sustainable Transportation System

The use of hydrogen as a fuel for cars and trucks has been touted as an environmentally responsible way to end America’s dependence on foreign oil. However, Making Sense of Hydrogen explains that a transition to a “hydrogen economy”—if poorly executed—could extend America’s dependence on fossil fuels and nuclear power, while doing little to solve the environmental problems caused by our dependence on polluting and dangerous sources of energy. Making Sense of Hydrogen outlines a sensible path for the development of an environmentally sound hydrogen economy, beginning with strong investments in improving automobile fuel economy and developing renewable sources of energy such as solar, wind and energy from crops.

(August 2004)
More Roads, More Traffic: The Failure of Road-Building to Alleviate Traffic Congestion in Maryland

Despite spending millions of dollars to build 7,000 lane mile to its road network from 1985 to 2000, Maryland’s congestion problem continues to get worse. A major reason is generated traffic—the new, longer, or diverted trips that develop once highway capacity in an area is increased. Generated traffic reduces or negates the congestion-fighting benefits of highway expansion. Evidence from university studies of congestion patterns, government statistics on transportation and academic research shows that highway expansion is not an effective way to fight congestion. Maryland should shift its transportation strategy away from costly highway expansion projects and toward alternatives that can provide more transportation choices to residents.

(April 2002)
Paving the Way: How Highway Construction Has Contributed to Sprawl in Maryland

Highway construction has been a key factor creating sprawl in Maryland. Data shows that highways intended to serve the needs of existing communities and alleviate traffic have instead allowed migration outward from the cities. They have been a cause of sprawl rather than a solution to congestion. Paving the Way presents an analysis of all developed residential and commercial properties in central Maryland and the Eastern Shore in relation to all major highways, finding that highways act as magnets for development.

(November 2000)

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