Reports on Global Warming

The reports below represent a sample of Frontier Group’s work on Global Warming. For more of our reports on this and related topics, please visit www.PolicyArchive.org. Full archive coming soon.

More Heat than Light: Global Warming Pollution from the Northeast's Dirtiest Power Producers

Most global warming pollution from electricity generation in the Northeast comes from a handful of power plants, owned by a small number of companies. More Heat than Light identifies the worst polluting power plants and their owners—making the case that cleaning up these plants should be the first step to reduce global warming pollution from power generation.

(July 2005)
Global Warming Pollution in New Jersey: Key Steps to Reduce Emissions from Electricity Generation and Transportation

Global Warming Pollution in New Jersey provides an inventory of carbon dioxide emissions in New Jersey. The study reveals that transportation and electricity generation produce 70 percent of emissions of carbon dioxide, the leading global warming pollutant, and that emissions from these sectors are expected to rise. The report concludes with suggestions for policies that could help reduce emissions in the state.

(April 2005)
Cars and Global Warming: Policy Options to Reduce Washington's Global Warming Pollution from Cars and Light Trucks

Cars and light trucks produce approximately 20 percent of Washington’s global warming pollution. Cars and Global Warming explains how Washington could reduce global warming emissions from passenger vehicles by adopting California’s clean car standards. By requiring advanced-technology vehicles—including hybrid-electric and eventually hydrogen vehicles—and establishing global warming pollution standards, the clean cars program could begin to reduce Washington’s contribution to global warming.

(March 2005)
Getting on Track: New England's Rising Global Warming Emissions and How to Reverse the Trend

In 2005, more than three years after New England’s governors adopted a landmark agreement to reduce the region’s contribution to global warming, emissions of carbon dioxide—the leading global warming gas—continue to rise. Getting on Track: New England’s Rising Global Warming Emissions and How to Reverse the Trend documents recent emissions trends, analyzes the effectiveness of various policies and approaches to reducing global warming that have been adopted by various states in the region, and suggests five steps that the New England states should prioritize in order to reverse the trend of increasing global warming emissions.

(February 2005)
A Blueprint for Action: Policy Options to Reduce Maine's Contribution to Global Warming

In 2001, the governors of the six New England states made an historic commitment to reduce their region’s emissions of global warming pollution. A Blueprint for Action documents how Maine could make major strides toward reducing emissions of global warming gases over the next several decades by adopting a series of policy strategies to improve energy efficiency and reduce the use of fossil fuels.

(July 2004)
A Blueprint for Action: Policy Options to Reduce Massachusetts' Contribution to Global Warming

In 2001, the governors of the six New England states made an historic commitment to reduce their region’s emissions of global warming pollution. A Blueprint for Action documents how Massachusetts could make major strides toward reducing emissions of global warming gases over the next several decades by adopting a series of policy strategies to improve energy efficiency and reduce the use of fossil fuels.

(March 2004)
A Blueprint for Action: Policy Options to Reduce Vermont's Contribution to Global Warming

In 2001, the governors of the six New England states made an historic commitment to reduce their region’s emissions of global warming pollution. A Blueprint for Action documents how Vermont could make major strides toward reducing emissions of global warming gases over the next several decades by adopting a series of policy strategies to improve energy efficiency and reduce the use of fossil fuels.

(March 2004)
Cars and Global Warming: Policy Options to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Massachusetts Cars and Light Trucks

The transportation sector produces roughly 35 percent of Massachusetts’ global warming pollution. Cars and Global Warming explains how Massachusetts could reduce global warming emissions from passenger vehicles by adopting California’s clean car standards. By requiring advanced-technology vehicles—including hybrid-electric and eventually hydrogen vehicles—and establishing global warming pollution standards, the clean cars program will begin to reduce Massachusetts’ contribution to global warming.

(April 2003)

Pages