Reports on Global Warming

The reports below represent a sample of Frontier Group’s work on Global Warming. For more of our reports on this and related topics, please visit www.PolicyArchive.org. Full archive coming soon.

A Blueprint for Action: Policy Options to Reduce Arizona's Contribution to Global Warming

Global warming, caused by human induced changes to the climate, is a major threat to Arizona’s future. A Blueprint for Action documents how Arizona could make major strides toward reducing emissions of global warming gases over the next several decades by adopting a series of policy strategies to improve energy efficiency and reduce the use of fossil fuels.

(April 2006)
A Blueprint for Action: Policy Options to Reduce New Mexico's Contribution to Global Warming

Global warming, caused by human induced changes to the climate, is a major threat to Arizona’s future. A Blueprint for Action documents how New Mexico could make major strides toward reducing emissions of global warming gases over the next several decades by adopting a series of policy strategies to improve energy efficiency and reduce the use of fossil fuels.

(March 2006)
Shifting Gears: 20 Tools for Reducing Global Warming Pollution from New England's Transportation System

Transportation is the leading source of carbon dioxide emissions in New England. To meet the region’s targets for reducing its contribution to global warming, policy-makers must find ways to reduce emissions from the transportation sector. Shifting Gears provides 20 policy ideas the region’s leaders can use to reduce transportation-sector emissions, along with case studies describing how communities and states in New England and elsewhere are using those ideas to curb global warming pollution and expand transportation choices.

(March 2006)
Cars and Global Warming: Policy Options to Reduce Arizona's Global Warming Pollution from Cars and Light Trucks

Cars and light trucks produce more than 20 percent of Arizona’s global warming pollution. Cars and Global Warming explains how Arizona could reduce global warming emissions from passenger vehicles by adopting California’s clean car standards. By requiring advanced-technology vehicles—including hybrid-electric and eventually hydrogen vehicles—and establishing global warming pollution standards, the clean cars program could begin to reduce Arizona’s contribution to global warming.

(February 2006)
State Clean Cars Programs: An Effective Way to Slash Global Warming Pollution

While the Bush administration and federal policymakers continue to resist efforts to reduce global warming pollution, many states are taking dramatic, effective actions to address the threat—including the adoption of the “Clean Cars Program” which sets limits on global warming pollution from cars, light trucks and SUVs. The 10 states that have adopted the Clean Cars Program will cut global warming pollution from cars, light trucks and SUVs by 64 million metric tons per year in 2020, while saving consumers money and reducing the nation’s reliance on oil

(February 2006)
Driving Global Warming: Commuting in Connecticut and its Contribution to Global Warming

Transportation is the leading source of global warming emissions in Connecticut and the trips that state residents make to and from work are a major contributor to the problem. Driving Global Warming documents the impact of commuting on global warming emissions in Connecticut, identifies towns whose commuters produce the greatest emissions, and suggests policy solutions that can reduce the region’s contribution to global warming.

(January 2006)
Driving Global Warming: Commuting in New Hampshire and its Contribution to Global Warming

Transportation is the leading source of global warming emissions in New Hampshire and the trips that state residents make to and from work are a major contributor to the problem. Driving Global Warming documents the impact of commuting on global warming emissions in New Hampshire, identifies towns whose commuters produce the greatest emissions and suggests policy solutions that can reduce the region’s contribution to global warming.

(January 2006)
Driving Global Warming: Commuting in Massachusetts and its Contribution to Global Warming

Transportation is the leading source of global warming emissions in Massachusetts and the trips that state residents make to and from work are a major contributor to the problem. Driving Global Warming documents the impact of commuting on global warming emissions in Massachusetts, identifies towns whose commuters produce the greatest emissions, and suggests policy solutions that can reduce the region’s contribution to global warming.

(January 2006)
Driving Global Warming: Commuting in Rhode Island and its Contribution to Global Warming

Transportation is the leading source of global warming emissions in Rhode Island and the trips that state residents make to and from work are a major contributor to the problem. Driving Global Warming documents the impact of commuting on global warming emissions in Rhode Island, identifies towns whose commuters produce the greatest emissions and suggests policy solutions that can reduce the region’s contribution to global warming.

(January 2006)
Driving Global Warming: Commuting in Maine and its Contribution to Global Warming

Transportation is responsible for nearly one third of global warming emissions in Maine and the trips that state residents make to and from work are a major contributor to the problem. Driving Global Warming documents the impact of commuting on global warming emissions in Maine, identifies towns whose commuters produce the greatest emissions and suggests policy solutions that can reduce the region’s contribution to global warming.

(January 2006)
Power Plants and Global Warming: Impacts on Maryland and Strategies for Reducing Emissions

Seven coal-fired power plants in Maryland produce nearly one third of the state’s emissions of carbon dioxide, the most common global warming pollutant. Power Plants and Global Warming demonstrates that Maryland can reduce its contribution to global warming and meet its electricity needs by tapping its energy efficiency potential and developing renewable energy resources. The first step to reducing emissions is adopting a cap on global warming emissions from coal-fired power plants.

(December 2005)
Cars and Global Warming: How the Clean Cars Program Curbs Global Warming Pollution in Oregon

The transportation sector produces 38 percent of Oregon’s global warming pollution. Cars and Global Warming explains how Oregon could reduce global warming emissions from passenger vehicles by adopting California’s clean car standards. By requiring advanced-technology vehicles—including hybrid-electric and eventually hydrogen vehicles—and establishing global warming pollution standards, the clean cars program could begin to reduce Oregon’s contribution to global warming.

(October 2005)
Cracks in the Cap: How the "Offsets" Loophole Undermines the Control of Global Warming Pollution from Power Plants

In 2005, Northeast states from Delaware to Maine worked on creating a regional system to limit global warming pollution from power plants, known as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). At the outset, the states agreed to focus on reducing global warming pollution from in-state electric power generators. However, negotiators began to consider five categories of offset measures—pollution cuts outside the regional electricity sector that would “offset” excess power plant pollution. Cracks in the Cap explores how these offset measures would erode the integrity of the program and undermine its benefits.

(September 2005)
Energy Efficiency: The Smart Way to Reduce Global Warming Pollution in the Northeast

In 2005, Northeast states from Delaware to Maine worked on developing a regional system to limit global warming pollution from power plants, known as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). The main argument against an aggressive cap is that it will cost too much. However, as Energy Efficiency: The Smart Way to Reduce Global Warming Pollution in the Northeast highlights, a strategy that couples limits on carbon dioxide emissions with vigorous efficiency measures can reduce the cost of the program, enable greater emission reductions and boost the region’s economy.

(August 2005)
More Heat than Light: Global Warming Pollution from the Northeast's Dirtiest Power Producers

Most global warming pollution from electricity generation in the Northeast comes from a handful of power plants, owned by a small number of companies. More Heat than Light identifies the worst polluting power plants and their owners—making the case that cleaning up these plants should be the first step to reduce global warming pollution from power generation.

(July 2005)

Pages