Reports on Global Warming

The reports below represent a sample of Frontier Group’s work on Global Warming. For more of our reports on this and related topics, please visit www.PolicyArchive.org. Full archive coming soon.

Falling Behind: New England Must Act Now to Reduce Global Warming Pollution

Recognizing the danger presented by global warming, in 2001 the New England governors and Eastern Canadian premiers adopted a landmark commitment to reduce the region’s emissions of global warming pollution to 1990 levels by 2010 and to 10 percent below 1990 levels by 2020. An analysis of global warming emission data for 2005, the most recent year available, shows that New England is not on track to meet the targets for global warming pollution reductions set by the New England governors in 2001. However, the good news for New England is that global warming pollution fell slightly from 2004 to 2005—the first year-to-year decrease since 2001—and that several indicators suggest that the decrease in emissions continued and accelerated in 2006.

(March 2008)
A Blueprint for Action: Policy Options to Reduce Wisconsin's Contribution to Global Warming

Global warming poses a serious threat to Wisconsin’s future. The state has already begun to respond to the problem, but additional action is needed if Wisconsin is going to do its share to prevent the worst impacts of global warming. A Blueprint for Action describes 13 policy steps that, if taken, would reduce the state’s global warming emissions to 23 percent below 2006 levels by 2020.

(June 2008)
A Blueprint for Action: Meeting Colorado's Goals for Reducing Global Warming Pollution

Global warming poses a serious threat to Colorado’s future. The state has already begun to respond to the problem, but additional action is needed if Colorado is going to do its share to prevent the worst impacts of global warming. A Blueprint for Action describes 16 policy steps that, if taken, would reduce the state’s global warming emissions to 23 percent below 2005 levels by 2020.

(December 2007)
When It Rains, It Pours: Global Warming and the Rising Frequency of Extreme Precipitation in the United States

Scientists expect that global warming will cause rainstorms and snowstorms to be more intense – increasing the risk of flooding and other impacts. When It Rains, It Pours evaluates trends in the frequency of storms with extreme levels of rainfall or snowfall across the contiguous United States over the last 60 years, finding that storms with extreme amounts of rain or snowfall are happening more often across most of America, consistent with the predicted impact of global warming.

(December 2007)
Cutting Pollution, Cutting Costs: How New Jersey Can Maximize the Benefits of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative

New Jersey and nine other northeastern states took a pioneering step to address global warming with adoption of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), the first regional cap-and-trade program for global warming pollution in the nation’s history. The RGGI agreement, however, gives individual states discretion over how to implement key parts of the program. Cutting Pollution, Cutting Costs describes how New Jersey can maximize the benefits of RGGI by auctioning pollution allowances and avoiding loopholes that would weaken the program.

(October 2007)
Cool Moves: Transit in New England and Its Role in Curbing Global Warming Pollution

New England’s transportation system produces more global warming pollution than any other sector of the region’s economy. Cool Moves documents how New England’s public transportation systems are helping to reduce global warming pollution in the region, while also saving oil and providing a host of other benefits to the region.

(September 2007)

Transportation produces roughly 42 percent of Florida’s global warming pollution. The Benefits of Adopting the Clean Cars Program in Florida explains how Florida could reduce global warming emissions from passenger vehicles by adopting California’s clean car standards. By requiring advanced-technology vehicles—including hybrid-electric and eventually hydrogen vehicles—and establishing global warming pollution standards, the clean cars program could begin to reduce Florida’s contribution to global warming.

(August 2007)
Cleaner, Cheaper, Smarter: The Case for Auctioning Pollution Allowances in a Global Warming Cap-and-Trade Program

“Cap and trade” programs are increasingly seen as a leading tool to reduce America’s emissions of global warming pollution. But while cap and trade can be an effective tool to reduce pollution at the lowest possible cost, the devil is in the details. Cleaner, Cheaper, Smarter addresses a critical choice policy-makers must make in designing a cap-and-trade program: the question of whether to give away pollution permits (called “allowances”) to polluters or to sell them in an auction. Auctioning allowances is a fairer, more efficient and more cost-effective solution than giving them away.

(July 2007)
An Unfamiliar State: Local Impacts of Global Warming in New Jersey

Global warming poses a serious threat to the future of New Jersey’s environment, economy, and the health and welfare of its citizens. As explored in An Unfamiliar State, Global warming threatens to alter the coastline, increase extremes of rainfall and drought, raise smog levels in parts of the state, and shift the plant and animal species that call New Jersey home. However, if we act now, there is still time to prevent many of the worst impacts of global warming. New Jersey must do its share to reduce global warming pollution and set an example for other states and the nation to follow.

(May 2007)
The Clean Cars Program: How States Are Driving Cuts in Global Warming Pollution

While the Bush administration continues to resist efforts to reduce global warming pollution, many states are taking effective actions to address the threat—including the adoption of the “Clean Cars Program,” which sets limits on global warming pollution from cars, light trucks and SUVs. The 12 states that have adopted the Clean Cars Program will cut global warming pollution from cars, light trucks and SUVs by 74 million metric tons per year in 2020. The federal government should not interfere with the progress being made by these states and should grant California’s request for a Clean Air Act waiver so that the states can implement the Clean Cars Program.

(May 2007)
An Unfamiliar State: How Global Warming Could Change Natural Wisconsin

Wisconsin residents have a strong connection with the outdoors. Global warming, however, threatens many of the natural landscapes and outdoor activities that Wisconsin residents hold dear, including the composition and health of the state’s forests, pastimes such as ice fishing and cross-country skiing, and the future of the state’s dairy industry. An Unfamiliar State summarizes the latest scientific findings about the likely impacts of global warming on “Natural Wisconsin” and suggests ways the state can reduce the threat.

(May 2007)
A Blueprint for Action: Policy Options to Reduce Illinois' Contribution to Global Warming

Global warming poses a serious threat to Illinois’ future. Significant action is needed if Illinois is going to do its share to prevent the worst impacts of global warming. A Blueprint for Action describes 13 policy steps that, if taken, would reduce the state’s global warming emissions by 31 percent below projected levels by 2018.

(January 2007)
A Blueprint for Action: Policy Options to Reduce New Jersey's Contribution to Global Warming

Global warming poses a serious threat to New Jersey’s future. The state has already begun to respond to the problem, but additional action is needed if New Jersey is going to do its share to prevent the worst impacts of global warming, like inundation of parts of the Jersey Shore from rising seas. A Blueprint for Action describes 11 policy steps that, if taken, would reduce the state’s global warming emissions to 6 percent below 2005 levels by 2020.

(September 2006)
Cars and Global Warming: Policy Options to Reduce Maryland's Global Warming Pollution from Cars and Light Trucks

Cars and light trucks produce roughly 25 percent of Maryland’s global warming pollution. Cars and Global Warming explains how Maryland could reduce global warming emissions from passenger vehicles by adopting California’s clean car standards. By requiring advanced-technology vehicles—including hybrid-electric and eventually hydrogen vehicles—and establishing global warming pollution standards, the clean cars program could begin to reduce Maryland’s contribution to global warming.

(September 2006)
Rising to the Challenge: Six Steps to Cut Global Warming Pollution in the United States

Global warming is real and is happening now. Scientists tell us that, to avoid the worst consequences of global warming, we need to begin reducing our emissions of global warming soon. Rising to the Challenge describes six strategies the United States can use to reduce its emissions of carbon dioxide – the leading global warming pollutant – by 19 percent by 2020. The report recommends several steps America can take to use energy more efficiently and to tap America’s abundant renewable energy resources, which can reduce the nation’s emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel use.

(July 2006)

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