Reports on Energy

The reports below represent a sample of Frontier Group’s work on Energy. For more of our reports on this and related topics, please visit www.PolicyArchive.org. Full archive coming soon.

Energy for Colorado's Economy: Creating Jobs and Economic Growth with Renewable Energy

In November 2004, the citizens of Colorado became the first in the nation to vote on and pass a statewide renewable energy requirement. Xcel Energy, the state’s largest investor-owned utility, responded by signing contracts for 775 megawatts of new wind farms in Colorado in 2006, demonstrating that the requirement could be met easily and quickly. Energy for Colorado’s Economy quantifies the benefits of setting the bar even higher, requiring the state’s top utilities to reach 20 percent renewable energy by 2020, concluding that a deeper commitment to renewable power will create more jobs, stimulate the economy, stabilize energy prices and further reduce the long-term economic and environmental risk from global warming pollution.

(February 2007)
The Road to a New Energy Future: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Technologies for a Cleaner, More Secure Energy Future

America doesn’t have to wait for revolutionary new technologies to get serious about addressing our nation’s energy crisis. The technology exists today to use energy far more efficiently in our cars, homes, and businesses and to get more of our energy from clean, renewable sources. The Road to a New Energy Future, a companion paper to A New Energy Future (Fall 2006), profiles the many technologies and practices that can help America achieve a cleaner energy future. It also describes the critical role of research and development in producing the next wave of clean energy technologies.

(October 2006)
Building Solutions: Energy Efficient Homes Save Money and Reduce Global Warming

Residential heating is responsible for 17 percent of Vermont’s global warming pollution. Heating contributes such a large share of pollution in the state because 50 percent of homes pre-date energy efficiency standards, a high percentage of furnaces are old and inefficient, and high-emission heating fuels are common. Building Solutions finds that by improving the efficiency of homes and heating equipment, Vermont could reduce global warming pollution from residential heating by 20 percent by 2020.

(October 2006)
A New Energy Future: The Benefits of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy for Cutting America's Use of Fossil Fuels

America faces an energy crisis. Oil and natural gas supplies are increasingly uncertain and prices for both fuels have set records recently. Meanwhile, our consumption of coal is contributing significantly to global warming, and other technologies – like nuclear power – are too dangerous, too expensive or both. A New Energy Future describes how renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies that largely exist today can cut America’s dependence on fossil fuels. By moving aggressively to promote clean energy, the report finds, America could cut its oil imports and coal consumption by as much as 80 percent compared to today’s levels.

(September 2006)
Greening the Bottom Line: California Companies Save Money by Reducing Global Warming Pollution

Pioneering businesses across California are beginning to do their share to cut global warming pollution. At the same time, these businesses are finding that reducing pollution can improve competitiveness and help the bottom line – cutting energy costs, reducing exposure to volatile fossil fuel and electricity prices, and attracting environmentally aware customers. Greening the Bottom Line highlights 12 such businesses or institutions and demonstrates the kinds of gains that can be had across California from an organized, statewide effort to reduce the state’s global warming pollution, demonstrating that action against global warming can be good for California businesses and our environment at the same time.

(August 2006)
Making Sense of the "Coal Rush": The Consequences of Expanding America's Dependence on Coal

As of June 2006, energy companies are proposing to build 150 new coal-fired plants across America, investing up to $137 billion. If energy companies succeed in building even a fraction of these new power plants, it would have major impacts on America’s environment and economy, and consume investment dollars that could otherwise promote more sustainable energy sources like energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Making Sense of the Coal Rush describes the dangers posed by an ill-considered rush to build coal-fired power plants and proposes policy changes and other actions that can put America on a more sensible energy path.

(July 2006)
Challenging Nuclear Power in the States: Policy and Organizing Tools for Slowing the "Nuclear Renaissance"

For the first time in more than three decades, there are viable proposals to build new nuclear power plants in the United States. Given the nuclear industry’s history of cost overruns and safety problems, Americans need a strong watchdog to protect their interests. Unfortunately, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has a poor track record of ensuring nuclear safety and federal law proscribes states from adopting their own regulations to protect the public. Challenging Nuclear Power in the States describes a series of policy and regulatory tools that citizens and advocates can use to challenge the expansion of nuclear power in the United States.

(April 2006)
On the Road to Energy Independence: Controlling New Jersey's Runaway Energy Demand Through Energy Efficiency

Consumption of electricity and natural gas is projected to rise significantly in New Jersey in coming years, costing consumers money and resulting in increased pollution. On the Road to Energy Independence explains how energy efficiency measures such as improved building codes, additional appliance efficiency standards and expanded energy efficiency programs could reduce energy consumption in New Jersey at a net financial gain to consumers.

(January 2006)
Consolidation of Power: How Exelon's Bid to Acquire PSEG Could Raise Rates, Reduce Reliability, and Risk Public Safety

In December 2004, Chicago-based Exelon Corporation announced plans to acquire Public Service Enterprise Group (PSEG), the last remaining New Jersey-based energy company that hasn’t been taken over by a large out-of-state corporation. Consolidation of Power analyzes the risks this deal poses to consumers in New Jersey’s deregulated electricity market—who depend upon vigorous competition between energy suppliers to get a fair deal for reliable service.

(November 2005)
Ready to Roll: The Benefits of Today's Advanced Technology Vehicles for Oregon

Despite tighter automobile emission standards over the past three decades, many states continue to face significant automobile-related air pollution problems. Ready to Roll: The Benefits of Today’s Advanced-Technology Vehicles for Oregon outlines how the use of advanced-technology vehicles—those that use cleaner, alternative fuels or new technological advances to achieve dramatically improved environmental performance—could alleviate air pollution problems while reducing global warming emissions and enhancing the state’s energy security. The report also documents that, although advanced technology vehicles are “ready to roll,” availability of these vehicles is limited in states that have not yet adopted the California Clean Car Standards.

(November 2005)
Consolidation of Power: How Exelon's Bid to Acquire PSEG Could Raise Rates, Reduce Reliability, and Risk Public Safety

In December 2004, Chicago-based Exelon Corporation announced plans to acquire Public Service Enterprise Group (PSEG), the last remaining New Jersey-based energy company that hasn’t been taken over by a large out-of-state corporation. Consolidation of Power analyzes the risks this deal poses to consumers in New Jersey’s deregulated electricity market—who depend upon vigorous competition between energy suppliers to get a fair deal for reliable service.

(November 2005)
Energy Efficiency: The Smart Way to Reduce Global Warming Pollution in the Northeast

In 2005, Northeast states from Delaware to Maine worked on developing a regional system to limit global warming pollution from power plants, known as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). The main argument against an aggressive cap is that it will cost too much. However, as Energy Efficiency: The Smart Way to Reduce Global Warming Pollution in the Northeast highlights, a strategy that couples limits on carbon dioxide emissions with vigorous efficiency measures can reduce the cost of the program, enable greater emission reductions and boost the region’s economy.

(August 2005)
Making Sense of America's Oil Needs: A Sustainable, State-Based Response to Dwindling Oil Supplies

Rising oil prices are pinching the American economy. And, if many oil industry analysts are correct, prices won’t be coming back down any time soon. Indeed, it appears that the era of “cheap oil” may well be over. Making Sense of America’s Oil Needs examines the long-term oil supply challenges facing the United States and the world and makes the case for short-term, medium-term and long-term strategies to reduce dependence on oil through improved energy efficiency and greater use of renewable energy sources.

(August 2005)
Achieving a New Energy Future: How States Can Lead America to a Clean, Sustainable Economy

At the dawn of the 21st century, America faces immense energy challenges, and enjoys boundless opportunities. To properly address these challenges, America must transform how it produces and consumes energy. We must do it. And we can. Achieving a New Energy Future details the contributions energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy can make to an economically and environmentally sustainable energy future.

(August 2005)
More Heat than Light: Global Warming Pollution from the Northeast's Dirtiest Power Producers

Most global warming pollution from electricity generation in the Northeast comes from a handful of power plants, owned by a small number of companies. More Heat than Light identifies the worst polluting power plants and their owners—making the case that cleaning up these plants should be the first step to reduce global warming pollution from power generation.

(July 2005)

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