Blog Posts tagged transportation

In 2016, with support from the Hewlett Foundation, Frontier Group released two reports outlining the vision and policy steps to achieve a carbon-free transportation future. We held a public webinar in January 2017 discussing what comes next. Watch the video here.

The U.S. still spends vast sums of money to build new highways and widen existing ones.

There are good reasons to believe that the recent rapid rate of growth of vehicle travel will not continue for long. But there are also many reasons to support public policy changes that will give more Americans the option not to drive and further reduce growth in vehicle travel in the years ahead.

For a decade, the United States seemed to be creeping away from our extreme dependence on fossil fuel-burning cars and trucks. Then, everything changed.

America, a nation that has been resolutely future-oriented throughout its history, now risks turning decisively back toward the past.

There is a direct line from the policy decisions the United States has made over the last century – decisions that have almost universally moved the country toward deepening dependence on fossil fuel-powered personal cars – to the climate-altering reality of today.

Fast Forward surveys the lay of the land for innovative mobility technologies and tools in Massachusetts, explores their potential impacts, and makes a series of recommendations for local, state and federal policy-makers.

Not only can shared networks enable people to choose the right tool for the job, but if we integrate sharing and autonomy into our cities intelligently, we can allow for the safe use of additional modes – like walking and bicycling – that are currently crowded off our streets by our over-reliance on the 20th century’s intended one-size-fits-all solution to our transportation challenges: the personal car.

Denver is one of the fastest growing cities in the country and rapidly changing as a result. What this change looks like will largely depend on policy.

Massachusetts continues to experience a slow slide in car commuting, and an increase in the importance of transit and active transportation – driven in part by economic and population growth in the region’s core and, relatedly, by shifting patterns of commuting among younger residents.

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